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3 reasons why Real PAC deserves a closer look

December 9, 2014 --

Dec. 9, 2014 — A complaint against a political committee supporting Gov. Nathan Deal may be dismissed without investigation tomorrow by the state ethics commission. An attorney for Real PAC, founded by two longtime friends of Deal’s, contends it didn’t have to file financial disclosures for the $970,000 it raised and spent in Georgia, nor did it have to operate independently of the governor’s re-election committee.

A review of campaign filings and other public documents, however, suggests the issue is not so clear-cut.

Alphabet soup: A guide to special interests in Georgia

Alphabet soup: A guide to special interests in Georgia
September 12, 2012 --

Unraveling campaign finance and lobbyist spending reports can be difficult if you don’t know the lingo. Trade associations frequently create political action committees (PACs) with names that mask, intentionally or not, the special interests behind them. Others are known only by obscure acronyms; some use the same acronym. So, as we continue to shine a light on special interests’ influence in Georgia, we’ve compiled this quick guide to who’s who among the PACs

ADA agrees to fine for political spending, but AHA may fight

ADA agrees to fine for political spending, but AHA may fight
December 8, 2010 --

Catching up with the State Ethics Commission: The Atlanta Development Authority has agreed to pay a $1,000 fine for promoting passage of a 2008 ballot question, but attorney Randy Evans said the city’s public housing agency disputes a similar complaint. Also last week, the commission backed down from requiring more financial reporting by so-called independent committees, demonstrating yet again the limits on its powers.

Profiles in courage: Funder of attack ads wants secrecy for donors

Profiles in courage: Funder of attack ads wants secrecy for donors
November 8, 2010 --

An advocacy group that spent $152,000 to help dump Georgia Congressman Jim Marshall wants to keep the identity of its donors secret. But it can’t, at least when it tries to influence state and local campaigns, under a draft opinion under review by the State Ethics Commission. The Center for Individual Freedom, led by CEO Jeffrey L. Mazzella, asked in August whether it could avoid disclosing donors for its political ads.