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Supremes: Fulton Co. whistleblowers deserve day in court

November 18, 2013 --

Nov. 18, 2013 — Two Fulton County whistleblowers may proceed with legal claims that they lost their jobs in retaliation for reporting misuse of taxpayers’ funds, the Georgia Supreme Court ruled today. The decision strengthens the state’s whistleblower law by holding that the law protects all public employees, not just those who work in state-funded programs, and dismissing Fulton County’s defense of sovereign immunity.

Supremes: Wrongly imprisoned man can sue Fulton court clerk

Supremes: Wrongly imprisoned man can sue Fulton court clerk
July 5, 2011 --

A child molestor who spent 22 months too long in prison can sue Fulton County court officials for mishandling papers that would have led to his release, the Georgia Supreme Court ruled today. Former Fulton County Superior Court Clerk Juanita Hicks cannot claim immunity from liability, the high court ruled in a unanimous decision, because the error breached her statutory duty to notify prison officials of the man’s reduced sentence.

Supremes: Cobb EMC violated deal with disgruntled members

Supremes: Cobb EMC violated deal with disgruntled members
June 13, 2011 --

Cobb Electric Membership Corp. violated a 2008 settlement with unhappy members who accused some co-op leaders of enriching themselves at members’ expense, the Georgia Supreme Court ruled today. Dissident members hoped to unseat board members in a scheduled 2009 election that was never held after the EMC’s leadership voted in secret to allow proxy voting by mail. The high court ruled the board may not unilaterally change the method by which its members are chosen.

Doraville lawyer who won’t quit gets 3-year suspension

January 10, 2011 --

The Georgia Supreme Court today ordered a 3-year suspension for an attorney who refused to stop appealing a client’s conviction and his own disciplinary action. The court’s order lays out a 10-year chain of court battles over a client’s $400 fine and 3-day jail sentence. The court found Arthur F. Millard’s actions showed “a basic disrespect of the attorney-client relationship and … needlessly subjected his client to liability, after she made clear that she no longer desired his services.”

Supreme Court runner-up still has $40K to explain

Supreme Court runner-up still has $40K to explain
December 1, 2010 --

Lawrenceville attorney Tammy Lynn Adkins got 735,000 votes Nov. 2 for a seat on the Georgia Supreme Court without spending a nickel. But she still hasn’t explained what she did with nearly $40,000 from her previous political campaign. Adkins will have to explain it to the State Ethics Commission, in response to an ethics complaint filed a couple weeks ago.

Negligence claim vs. deputies revived in courthouse shootings

Negligence claim vs. deputies revived in courthouse shootings
March 18, 2010 --

Survivors of the 2005 Fulton County Courthouse shootings have made a sufficiently strong case to revive their lawsuit alleging negligence by security officers, the Georgia Court of Appeals has ruled. Court workers contend sheriff’s deputies did little or nothing to step up security around inmate Brian Nichols and compromised courthouse safety by misusing sick leave and leaving their posts for a breakfast run.

High court: Sovereign immunity doesn’t protect state in teen’s death

March 1, 2010 --

Georgia’s Supreme Court has ruled that a Thomas County woman may proceed with a lawsuit alleging negligence in her 18-year-old son’s death at a state-run mental health and drug addiction center. The decision, which extends the definition of a state employee to include a contract worker, has broader implications as governments continue to downsize and outsource functions to private contractors.

GA Supremes overturn ex-cop’s double-dipping conviction

GA Supremes overturn ex-cop's double-dipping conviction
January 25, 2010 --

Former Unadilla Police Chief Leonard Smith was never told when a grand jury would consider indicting him for billing two different police agencies for work during the same hours. That oversight was enough to throw out his conviction and five-year prison sentence, the Georgia Supreme Court ruled today.

Pam Stephenson’s law degree questioned in ex-CEO’s lawsuit

Pam Stephenson's law degree questioned in ex-CEO's lawsuit
June 4, 2009 --

State Rep. Pam Stephenson (right), chair of the Fulton-DeKalb Hospital Authority, insists she has a law degree, even though a registrar says the school transcript does not show it. The proof, it would seem, is not in the pudding, but in a sealed envelope tucked away in a file cabinet on the fifth floor of […]