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  • transparency project

    Rep. Alisha Morgan: Undisclosed pro-charter job

    Rep. Alisha Morgan: Undisclosed pro-charter job

    July 16, 2014 — Alisha Morgan has made no secret of her support for charter schools or her affiliation with the pro-charter Black Alliance for Educational Options, noting it in several online biographies. But when filed her personal financial disclosures with the state ethics commission in 2012, she neglected to mention that the alliance had been paying her.

    Morgan served on the alliance’s board in 2010 and 2011 before taking a salaried position there to recruit and train other activists for charter schools and school choice. A campaign spokesman said Morgan would review her past disclosures, which did not list either position at the alliance, and amend them “if necessary.”

    Valarie Wilson for superintendent: Late, missing disclosures

    Valarie Wilson for superintendent: Late, missing disclosures

    July 16, 2014 — Wilson’s Democratic opponent for state school superintendent omitted information from personal financial disclosures, but Wilson didn’t file a disclosure at all in 2012. Her 2014 disclosure, due in March, was filed July 13 after Atlanta Unfiltered contacted her campaign to ask where it was. A staffer indicated Wilson had tried to file the 2014 report twice previously but did not respond to telephone messages seeking more information.

    As of July 2014, Wilson owed the state ethics commission $250 in late filing fees. Wilson’s campaign manager said she paid $325 in late fees on Wilson’s behalf July 18 when ethics staffers told her that was all that she owed. (The remaining unpaid fees can be found under a different spelling of Wilson’s name.) The commission, for logistical and cost reasons, does not notify candidates when they owe late filing fees.

    Superintendent candidate Mike Buck

    Superintendent candidate Mike Buck

    Buck’s biggest donor so far is International Teacher Training Institute Global (ITTI Global), an organization with offices in Duluth that organized a 2013 cultural exchange with South Korea for Georgia teachers. ITTI also donated $20,000 to Buck’s boss, state School Superintendent John Barge, for his 2014 race for governor.

    International Teacher Training Institute Global (ITTI), – See more at: http://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Pages/PressReleaseDetails.aspx?PressView=default&pid=106#sthash.IzXqvVD0.dpuf
    International Teacher Training Institute Global (ITTI), – See more at: http://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Pages/PressReleaseDetails.aspx?PressView=default&pid=106#sthash.IzXqvVD0.dpuf
    International Teacher Training Institute Global (ITTI), – See more at: http://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/communications/Pages/PressReleaseDetails.aspx?PressView=default&pid=106#sthash.IzXqvVD0.dpuf

    Superintendent candidate Richard Woods

    Superintendent candidate Richard Woods

    Woods came close to becoming Georgia’s school superintendent in 2010, losing the Republican primary by just 16,000 votes to eventual winner John Barge. His campaign raised about $28,000 through June 30. He missed the filing deadline for his most recent disclosure, which was due July 16.

    Sen. Horacena Tate: State funds for day care unmentioned

    Sen. Horacena Tate: State funds for day care unmentioned

    Prior to May 2014, Horacena Tate did not disclose her role as CEO of an Atlanta day-care center, the Ashby Street Learning Academy. Nor did she disclose her role as partial owner of the day care or of the $560,000 it had received from the state Department of Early Care and Learning since 2009. Tate amended her most recent disclosure to include fiduciary positions for Ashby Street and several other for- and non-profit corporations after Atlanta Unfiltered called the omissions to her attention.

    Senate candidate Reginald Crossley: No 2014 disclosure

    Senate candidate Reginald Crossley: No 2014 disclosure

    Reginald Crossley failed to file a disclosure of his personal finances, which was due March 18, for his 2014 campaign against incumbent Sen. Horacena Tate. The following information is based on the disclosure filed for his 2012 campaign against Tate.

    Sen. David Lucas

    Sen. David Lucas

    Former Rep. David Lucas has kept much of his campaign spending off the radar over the years, moreso perhaps than any other Georgia legislator. Since 2010 his House campaign committee reported spending more than $78,000 — 46 percent of all disbursements — for unspecified purposes. Lucas has also kept some private business interests off the radar, including his wife’s consulting business and his role as an officer in the non-profit Bowden Men’s Golf Association, which has received payments from his campaign and from a political action committee that employs lobbyists at the Capitol. Lucas still hasn’t filed a disclosure for 2012.

    Records show NewTown Macon Inc., a non-profit promoting development in downtown Macon, paid Lucas and his company $24,350 — an amount he has declined to disclose — to campaign for passage of a 1 percent local option sales tax in 2010. NewTown also played a role in a small land transaction that netted Lucas a $3,400 profit in 2008.

    Senate candidate Miriam Paris

    Senate candidate Miriam Paris

    Paris hadn’t filed her 2013 disclosure of her personal finances, due six weeks earlier, when we talked last week. “I have not done it yet, but it will be done,” she said. “We’ve just been running a race, and it keeps slipping off the radar.”

    Her most recent personal disclosure, filed in 2012, omitted her membership on two non-profit boards — the Greater Macon Chamber of Commerce and NewTown Macon Inc.

    Check out our other legislator profiles

    Senate candidate Bill Hembree

    Senate candidate Bill Hembree

    Bill Hembree chaired both the Higher Education and Industrial Relations committees in the Georgia House. His interest in insurance issues, though, drew the most interest from campaign donors during his 18 years in that chamber. The owner of a Nationwide Insurance franchise, Hembree collected more than $95,000 in campaign money from the insurance industry from 1998 to 2012, as well as $167,000 more from health care interests, an analysis of campaign disclosures shows. That represents 44 percent of all his reported donations in that span.

    In 2012, Hembree took advantage of a loophole in state election law to indirectly transfer $60,000 from his House campaign account to his Senate campaign.

    Check out our other legislator profiles

    Sen. Mike Dugan

    Sen. Mike Dugan

    There are discrepancies between Mike Dugan’s December 2012 campaign disclosure, which shows an end balance of $4,400, and his next filing in July 2013, which reports a beginning balance of zero. The earlier report also showed the campaign still owed him $9,750 of a $15,000 loan, while the later filing showed no carried-over debt.

    Check out our other legislative profiles

    Georgia Legislature transparency profiles (a work in progress)

    Georgia House of Representatives David Ralston (R-Blue Ridge), speaker of the House Jan Jones (R-Milton), speaker pro tem Larry O’Neal (R-Bonaire), majority leader Stacey Abrams (D-Atlanta), minority leader HD1 John Deffenbaugh (R-Lookout Mountain); challenger Robert Goff HD2 Steve Tarvin (R-Chickamauga) HD3 Tom Weldon (R-Ringgold), Juvenile Justice chair HD 4 Bruce Broadrick (R-Dalton) HD5 John Meadows […]

    McDaniel skipped campaign filings, omitted debts

    McDaniel skipped campaign filings, omitted debts
    Reuben McDaniel hasn’t been much for filing political disclosures since his 2009 election to the Atlanta Board of Education, racking up $750 in unpaid late or non-filing fees as a result. He’s skipped six campaign finance filings and three annual disclosures of his personal finances that are required by law.
    His apparent lassitude regarding filings with securities regulators could prove more problematic. McDaniel, who’s registered as both a securities broker and an investment adviser representative, has made no disclosure of two liens and an IRS tax obligation, each for $11,000 or more, or a $715,000 loan default. Securities brokers and investment advisers must notify regulators about unsatisfied liens as well as foreclosures and other “compromises with creditors” so that potential investors can access and review them.
  • about this page

    Some criminals have their photos and crimes plastered all over the Internet, so people know who they are and what they did. Not politicians -- until now. The Crooked Politician Registry is an archive of info on public servants who crossed the line.

  • do it yourself corruption investigation

    Most public corruption cases in Georgia are prosecuted in federal court. The U.S. attorney for North Georgia, including metro Atlanta, has an excellent Web site with archived news releases on prominent cases.

    Federal court files may be searched online for a nominal fee through PACER. (The first $10 a year of searches are free.)

    With the right keywords, online search engines will also turn up news releases or court rulings on a particular case at no cost.

    You can also search the Georgia and federal prison systems to find inmates and their crimes.