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    Sen. Charlie Bethel (SD 54): Here come da judge

    Sen. Charlie Bethel (SD 54): Here come da judge

    Nov. 10, 2016 — Gov. Nathan Deal has appointed Charlie Bethel, a former floor leader of his in the Senate, to the Georgia Court of Appeals. Bethel was among 79 lawyers nominated for the job. The appointment, coming one day after he was re-elected to a fourth term, will necessitate a special election to fill Bethel’s seat in the Senate.

    Bethel’s campaign paid The Sassafras Group, a consulting firm founded by Deal’s daughter-in-law Denise Deal, $3,100 for fund-raising in May 2016.

    Rep. Dale Rutledge (HD 109)

    Rep. Dale Rutledge (HD 109)

    Nov. 6, 2016 — Dale Rutledge, running an ethics-based campaign against a House incumbent, lodged a complaint against himself in 2012. It cost him $975.

    The complaint said he had donated and the campaign had spent about $7,200 before filing the necessary paperwork. Looking further, investigators found he also failed to report three $1,000 contributions in the weeks before the July 2012 primary.

    In 2015, Rutledge signed a consent order with the state ethics commission and paid a $975 fine to resolve the case.

    HD 109 candidate Jane Askew Rutledge

    HD 109 candidate Jane Askew Rutledge

    Nov. 6, 2016 — Jane Rutledge has self-funded her 2016 campaign, receiving no other political donations. The personal financial disclosure that she filed this year did not include her home as well as 15 acres of farmland. She told us the omission was an oversight and she would correct it.

    SD 40 candidate Tamara Johnson-Shealey

    SD 40 candidate Tamara Johnson-Shealey

    Nov. 5, 2016 — Unions have donated $4,700 to Tamara Johnson-Shealey’s two races for the state Senate. Sixty percent of her campaign funds, though, have come from donors of $100 or less.

    Johnson-Shealey left her home and business off the personal financial disclosure she filed in March 2016. She said the omission was an oversight and amended the disclosure on Nov. 4 after Atlanta Unfiltered called her attention to it.

    Sen. Fran Millar (SD 40): State paid $2,100 in campaign expenses

    Sen. Fran Millar (SD 40): State paid $2,100 in campaign expenses

    Nov. 5, 2016 — Fran Millar’s campaign spent more than $2,100 in 2012 on social media, including Tweets and Facebook posts about Republican politics and the failures of Obamacare. Then he got taxpayers to foot the bill.

    Millar’s Senate expense account paid him back for the social media expenses, even though bills paid with campaign funds aren’t eligible for reimbursement. Millar later returned the money, after Atlanta Unfiltered inquired about it, but insisted the spending was a legitimate use of his Senate account.

    Rep. Valerie Clark (HD 101)

    Rep. Valerie Clark (HD 101)

    Valerie Clark, then principal of Central Gwinnett High School, retired in January 2009 after 38 years as an educator. A month later, news reports surfaced that an internal investigation had been under way to determine if she had blocked a disciplinary action against her son for allegedly soliciting marijuana on campus. Clark released a statement at the time saying she initially “did not have all the facts” and thought the incident had occurred off-campus. The school subsequently investigated and took all of the students to a disciplinary panel, she said.

    Clark’s 2012 election opponent, Timothy Swiney, alleges that she co-sponsored a bill mandating destruction of school employees’ investigative files if they did not end in disciplinary action, “effectively destroy[ing] all evidence of wrongdoing.” The bill in question, however, did not pass and, even if it had, would not have sealed Clark’s investigative file.

    Rep-elect. Samuel Park (HD 101)

    Rep-elect. Samuel Park (HD 101)

    Nov. 3, 2016 — Samuel Park has raised a respectable $44,000 for his 2016 House race, thanks in part to his involvement in Democratic activities in recent years. He’s also drawn a good bit support from Gwinnett County’s Korean-American community.

    Sen. Elena Parent (SD 42)

    Sen. Elena Parent (SD 42)

    Nov. 1, 2016 — Members of Atlanta’s legal community — led by the firm of Sutherland Asbill & Brennan, where she was an associate from 2002 to 2008 — are Elena Parent’s biggest backers. They’ve kicked in more than $221,000 in campaign donations, nearly 40 percent of her total. Parent has also received more than $26,000 from Home Depot, where her husband was once deputy general counsel, and current and former executives.

    SD 42 candidate Kenneth Quarterman

    SD 42 candidate Kenneth Quarterman

    Nov. 1, 2016Kenneth Quarterman has raised $858 in political donations over six campaigns for the Legislature. He’s put more than $1,200 of personal funds into those campaigns.

    HD 81 candidate Lane Flynn

    HD 81 candidate Lane Flynn

    Nov. 1, 2016 — Lane Flynn, a first-time candidate, has raised more than $21,000 — or 60 percent of all his donations — fro Republican lawmakers. He’s also expected to benefit from two mailings paid for by PRICE PAC, a new SUPER PAC funded by U.S. Rep. Tom Price’s campaign committee.

    Rep. Scott Holcomb (HD 81)

    Rep. Scott Holcomb (HD 81)

    Nov. 1, 2016 — Scott Holcomb is one of several Atlanta-area legislators whose financial support comes from, well, other Atlanta-area lawyers. Lawyers and law firms from the metro area have given Holcomb’s campaign more than $98,000 — roughly one-fourth of his total contributions. Other attorneys have donated $30,000 more.

    Rep. Emory Dunahoo (HD 30)

    Rep. Emory Dunahoo (HD 30)

    Oct. 30, 2016 — Georgia’s small-loan companies are Emory Dunahoo’s most generous campaign donors. He’s raised more than $44,000 from them, or about 30 percent of all his contributions, and seven of his top 10 donors are in the industry. Most of these donations are clustered in the spring after each legislative session: $10,250 in 2013, $5,000 in 2014, $4,750 in 2015, and $7,350 in 2016.

  • about this page

    Some criminals have their photos and crimes plastered all over the Internet, so people know who they are and what they did. Not politicians -- until now. The Crooked Politician Registry is an archive of info on public servants who crossed the line.

  • do it yourself corruption investigation

    Most public corruption cases in Georgia are prosecuted in federal court. The U.S. attorney for North Georgia, including metro Atlanta, has an excellent Web site with archived news releases on prominent cases.

    Federal court files may be searched online for a nominal fee through PACER. (The first $10 a year of searches are free.)

    With the right keywords, online search engines will also turn up news releases or court rulings on a particular case at no cost.

    You can also search the Georgia and federal prison systems to find inmates and their crimes.