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    Senate Appropriations Chair Jack Hill (SD 4)

     

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    Jack S. Hill (R-Reidsville)

    District 4 (Bulloch, Effingham, Emanuel, Evans, Candler & Tattnall counties)

     

     

    Jack HillJack Hill’s come a long way. For his first Senate campaign in 1990, he vowed not to take donations over $100. After serving three terms, his 1996 re-election bid raised $3,050 — less than any other senator.

    Now, Hill raises more than $100,000 a year in political donations because, as Senate Appropriations chair, he’s one of the guys that everyone sucks up to. And, facing only the occasional opponent for re-election, he has little to spend it on. Hill gives much of the money away to other candidates and political committees — more than $340,000 since 2005.

    Hospitals, nursing homes, doctors, dentists and other medical providers — all dependent on state Medicaid reimbursements that Hill’s committee oversees — are prominent among the top contributors to his campaign fund.

    Other notable donor groups include top administrators and faculty at Georgia Southern University, Hill’s alma mater, and Corrections Corporation of America and other players in the private prison industry. Hill’s district is home to Georgia State Prison, the state’s largest maximum-security facility.

    Hill became Appropriations chair in 2003 after switching to the Republican Party, just a week after being re-elected as a Democrat. He wound up refunding $9,850 to Democratic donors who complained.

    Hill and three other party-switchers gave the GOP control of the state Senate in 2003. All four were rewarded with committee chairmanships. 

    Legislative website

    Voting record

    Political career

    • Elected to the Senate in 1990, winning a runoff after falling one vote short of a majority in the Democratic primary.
    • With two exceptions, re-elected since then without opposition.
    • Defeated a Republican opponent in 2002 with 56% of the vote; became a Republican a week later.
    • In 2004, won 73% of the vote to defeat a Democratic challenger.
    • Ran for Senate majority leader in 1996, losing to Charles Walker of Augusta.

    Committee assignments

    • Appropriations (1991 – present; chair, 2003 – present)
    • Finance (ex-officio, 2007 – present)
    • Natural Resources & the Environment (1991 – 1993, 2003 – present)
    • Regulated Industries & Utilities (2003 – present)
    • Rules (1999 – present)
    • Corrections (1991 – 1998)
    • Education (1994; chair, 1994)
    • Ethics (1993 – 2010; chair, 1993)
    • Higher Education (1995 – 2002; chair, 1995 – 2002)
    • Joint Legislative Ethics (2007 – 2010)
    • Reapportionment (2001 – 2004)
    • Transportation (1991 – 2002)

    Employment

    • Retired grocer.

    Business ownership interests

    • None disclosed.

    Other fiduciary positions

    • None disclosed.

    Real estate holdings

    • Personal residence (in spouse’s name) valued at $110,000 on 3 acres in Reidsville.
    • Commercial rental property valued at $648,000 in Reidsville.
    • Commercial rental property valued at $189,000 in Reidsville.
    • Warehouse building & parking lot in Reidsville valued at $99,000.
    • House used as Hill’s Senate district office, valued at $77,000.
    • Two rental houses in Reidsville valued at $48,000 and $66,000.
    • Single-family house in Reidsville used for storage, valued at $17,000.
    • Storage house in Reidsville valued at $13,000.

    Other investments

    • None disclosed.

    Payments from state agencies

    • None disclosed.

    Friends and Family

    • Hill’s father, S. Wilton Hill, served one term in the state Senate (1957-58) and as Reidsville mayor and city councilman. He also served as director and lobbyist for the state School Bus Drivers Association.

    Campaign contributions

    Donors have contributed more than $1.75 million to Hill’s campaigns since 1998. The breakdown by election cycle:

    • 1998: $8,126
    • 2000: $10,650
    • 2001-02: $195,436
    • 2003-04: $288,490
    • 2005-06: $213,937
    • 2007-08: $221,100
    • 2009-10: $172,235
    • 2011-12: $210,496
    • 2013-14: $223,237
    • 2015-16: $202,285
    • Reported cash on hand (Oct. 2016): $140,220

    Top donors

    • $11,213 Ex-Sen. Eric Johnson & other Republican lawmakers
    • $64,600 Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America & member firms
    • $31,650 Georgia Hospital Association
    • $27,400 BlueCross BlueShield of Georgia / Amerigroup
    • $24,600 WellCare Management Group, health care management organization
    • $23,000 Georgia Health Care Association, nursing homes
    • $21,500 United Health Services of Georgia, nursing home chain
    • $20,500 Medical Association of Georgia
    • $18,250 Georgia Dental Association
    • $17,450 Altria / Philip Morris USA
    • $17,450 Georgia Optometric Association
    • $16,882 Claxton Poultry Farms
    • $14,850 Cook Management Services & Pine Leaf Investments, nursing homes
    • $14,500 Georgia Bankers Association
    • $14,400 Centene Management Co., health care management organization
    • $14,350 Coca-Cola & the Georgia Beverage Association
    • $13,900 Georgia Association of Realtors
    • $13,800 W.A. Crider Jr., Stillmore, Ga., poultry farmer
    • $13,700 Rotary Corp., manufacturer, Glennville, Ga.
    • $13,300 Ex-Sen. Hugh Gillis & family
    • $13,250 Mercer University executives

     

    • $13,000 Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of Georgia
    • $12,750 Corrections Corporation of America
    • $12,050 Troutman Sanders LLP, law/lobbying firm
    • $12,000 Donald Leebern Jr., liquor distributor
    • $11,350 Georgia Pharmacy Association
    • $11,102 Georgia Automobile Dealers Association
    • $10,500 Georgia Chiropractic Association
    • $10,500 Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP, law/lobbying firm
    • $10,250 MAG Mutual Insurance Co.
    • $10,050 Georgia Highway Contractors Association

     

    • $10,000 General Electric Co.
    • $10,000 Georgia Trial Lawyers Association
    • $10,000 Logisticare Solutions LLC, non-emergency medical transportation
    • $10,000 Synovus Financial Corp., banking
    • $9,750 Home Builders Association of Georgia
    • $9,700 Independent Insurance Agents of Georgia
    • $9,600 Georgia Alliance of Community Hospitals
    • $9,525 Georgia Southern University staff & faculty
    • $9,150 Hospital Corporation of America
    • $9,000 Mark Sanders, Bogart, Ga., lobbyist
    • $8,500 Claude Howard Lumber Co., Statesboro, Ga.
    • $8,150 Georgia Industrial Loan Association
    • $8,000 Associated General Contractors of Georgia
    • $8,500 Georgia-Pacific Corp. / Koch Industries / Colonial Pipeline
    • $8,000 Nightingale Services Inc., home health care
    • $7,500 DaVita, kidney dialysis
    • $7,500 Georgia Oilmen’s Association
    • $7,450 Bryan Cave LLP, law firm
    • $7,250 AT&T
    • $7,100 Title Pawn of Statesboro
    • $6,800 Anheuser-Busch Companies
    • $9,250 CorrectHealth LLC / Triage Holding, correctional health care
    • $6,750 Walmart
    • $6,500 Community Health Systems
    • $6,500 Gulfstream Aerospace Corp., jet aircraft manufacturer
    • $6,500 John Deere US, farm equipment
    • $6,500 United Health Group, Minneapolis, Minn., managed care organization
    • $6,250 Community Bankers Association of Georgia
    • $6,250 Georgia Apartment Association
    • $6,250 Industry Buying Group Administrators, Statesboro, Ga.
    • $6,140 Heart of Georgia Railway / Rural Shortline executives
    • $6,008 Georgia Association of Community Care Providers
    • $6,000 Georgia Food Industry Association
    • $6,000 Georgia Poultry Federation
    • $6,000 MEDNAX Inc., health care
    • $6,000 Mark Sanders, Bogart, Ga., lobbyist
    • $5,900 Waste Management
    • $5,750 Tenet Healthcare
    • $5,750 Georgia Association of Convenience Stores
    • $5,500 Georgia Mining Association
    • $5,500 McKenna Long Aldridge LLP, law/lobbying firm
    • $5,415 McGuire Woods, law/lobbying firm
    • $5,280 John Shuman, Reidsville, Ga., onion broker
    • $5,250 Georgia Manufactured Housing Association
    • $5,200 Delta Air Lines
    • $5,150 AFLAC
    • $5,000 Thomas David, Statesboro, Ga., retired banker
    • $5,000 Education Management Corp., Pittsburgh, Pa.
    • $5,000 Georgia Society of Anesthesiologists
    • $5,000 Sumner Brothers LLC, Statesboro, Ga., service station

    Campaign selfies

    Since 2007, Hill’s campaign has paid him $22,950 ($212.50 a month) to rent space for his Senate district office. Disclosures identify the recipient of the rent payments as JH Properties. Hill said JH Properties is not a business entity but a bookkeeping device to track income and expenses for the property.

    Campaign-to-campaign donations

    Candidates may give campaign funds to other candidates, a practice that some say provides a legal means to circumvent contribution limits. A 2003 bill to ban such transfers passed in the Senate but died in the House. Hill’s campaign made these donations:

    • 1999-2000: $3,200
    • 2001-02: $4,300
    • 2003-04: $17,250
    • 2005-06: $110,700
    • 2007-08: $63,150
    • 2009-10: $55,550
    • 2011-12: $42,699
    • 2013-14: $59,100
    • 2015: $29,700

    Lobbyist freebies

    Lobbyists have reported paying for meals and other gifts for Hill valued at more than $24,000 since 2006. The big spenders: University System of Georgia ($3,897), Georgia Food Industry Association ($3,943), Southern Wood Producers Association ($1,050).

    • 2006: $2,135
    • 2007: $2,206
    • 2008: $3,829
    • 2009: $2,225
    • 2010: $3,871
    • 2011: $4,151
    • 2012: $1,756
    • 2013: $1,674
    • 2014: $782
    • 2015: $1,432

    Committee days & travel expenses

    When out of session, legislators may collect $173 per day plus mileage for committee meetings or other official business. (Per diem was $127 until 2007.) Those living within 50 miles of the Capitol are taxed on these payments, originally intended to cover out-of-town members’ food and lodging.

    • 2001: $13,063 (63 days) #10 in Senate
    • 2002: $5,595 (34 days)
    • 2003: $16,057 (84 days) #5 in Senate
    • 2004: $9,230 (52 days) #5 in Senate
    • 2005: $13,748 (57 days) #8 in Senate
    • 2006: $14,754 (61 days) #4 in Senate
    • 2007: $20,258 (77 days) #5 in Senate
    • 2008: $21,749 (73 days) #8 in Senate
    • 2009: $23,106 (76 days) #3 in Senate
    • 2010: $19,202 (74 days) #3 in Senate
    • 2011: $13,245 (53 days)
    • 2012: $15,902 (55 days) #8 in Senate
    • 2013: $15,456 (50 days)
    • 2014: $12,662 (42 days)
    • 2015: $15,851 (51 days)

    Updated Nov. 21, 2016

     

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