blow the whistle
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Jan. 13

January 13, 2011 --

Former SCLC leader Rev. Raleigh Trammell indicted Female victim of Ga. electric chair to be honored Deal adds $106K to judicial oversight budget Better Business Bureau lists top scams of 2010

Jan. 12

January 12, 2011 --

County resources used to clear legislator’s driveway Savannah hospital CEO’s ouster to cost $900K Bibb property taxes to become more unfair under new state law, some say Audit: Medicaid companies improving

Fulton County: Whistleblowers cannot sue us

Fulton County: Whistleblowers cannot sue us
January 12, 2011 --

Two Fulton County employees who lost their jobs are not whistleblowers, attorneys for the county say, but even if they were, they can’t sue the county. The workers say they were caught up in a backlash against a politically sensitive probe of the misuse of county funds. Now the county contends it is immune from claims under Georgia’s whistleblower law — an argument that could undermine such suits across the state.

Jan. 11

January 11, 2011 --

Georgia plan would raise taxes initially Reactor design still drawing criticism

Jan. 9

January 10, 2011 --

Cracks in system let trooper shooting suspect stay free Deal brings in campaign cash since winning

Doraville lawyer who won’t quit gets 3-year suspension

January 10, 2011 --

The Georgia Supreme Court today ordered a 3-year suspension for an attorney who refused to stop appealing a client’s conviction and his own disciplinary action. The court’s order lays out a 10-year chain of court battles over a client’s $400 fine and 3-day jail sentence. The court found Arthur F. Millard’s actions showed “a basic disrespect of the attorney-client relationship and … needlessly subjected his client to liability, after she made clear that she no longer desired his services.”

2011: A brave new world of ethics enforcement

2011: A brave new world of ethics enforcement
January 10, 2011 --

Among the consequences of Georgia’s new ethics law: It will require more reporting by lobbyists and will probably thin out their herd, at least at the state level. It will relieve hundreds of the new governor’s appointees of the need to disclose even a smidgen about their personal finances. And, combined with budget problems, it will require the state ethics commission for the next several months to set aside one of its core missions, says its chairman, Patrick Millsaps.

Jan. 8

January 8, 2011 --

Prosecutors: Cobb EMC saga began with broken promise UPS, FedEx are subjects of antitrust investigation Federal lawsuit claims discrimination in DeKalb Fire Department New panel formed to examine issues around church finances Cobb Co. manager answers grand jury’s questions Bed of Athens stream tainted

Lobbyists in line to handle Ga. reapportionment?

Lobbyists in line to handle Ga. reapportionment?
January 8, 2011 --

Legislative leaders are in discussions to hire a prominent lobbying firm to help redraw district lines for the Georgia House and Senate this year. Under the proposal, Troutman Sanders Strategies would work on reapportionment maps for the Legislature and the state’s delegation to Congress. The firm recently hired former House Majority Leader Jerry Keen, and chairman Pete Robinson serves on Gov.-elect Nathan Deal’s transition team.

Jan. 7

January 7, 2011 --

Cobb EMC chief indicted for racketeering, theft Deal sets up payment plan for debt Editorial: Transparency missing in tax reform panel

Jan. 6

January 6, 2011 --

GBI to investigate allegations of inmate abuse Signature bonds under review following trooper shooting Former Gwinnett judge charged with felony forgeries Hall Co. commissioners force 4 top officials to resign Tea party enters ethics alliance aimed at Legislature Judges reverse rehiring of ‘love offering’ magistrate

Appraisers: Oaky Woods sellers got sweet deal in 2004

Appraisers: Oaky Woods sellers got sweet deal in 2004
January 5, 2011 --

The site of the Oaky Woods wildlife area sold for such a sweet price in 2004 that the sale cannot be used to determine a value today, state appraisers say. The state last week forked over $2,860 an acre — 75 percent more than the ’04 price — for a portion of the tract. A subsidiary of Synovus Financial, the Columbus-based banking giant that’s lost a pile on bad real-estate loans, pocketed about a third of the proceeds.