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  • Crawford leaves public defender post for judgeship

    August 16, 2010 --

    Robert “Mack” Crawford was named a Griffin Circuit Superior Court judge last week despite a blistering eight-page critique of his management of Georgia’s system of public defenders. Criminal defense attorney Stephen Bright wrote the Judicial Nominating Commission trying to block Crawford’s appointment, describing his three years as director of the Georgia Public Defender Standards Council as an “unmitigated disaster.”

    Judges reject interrogation evidence in Gitmo cases

    Judges reject interrogation evidence in Gitmo cases
    August 16, 2010 --

    The federal government has lost eight of 15 cases in which Guantánamo inmates have said they or witnesses against them were forcibly interrogated. That’s according to a review of 31 published decisions that resolve lawsuits filed by 52 captives who said they’ve been wrongfully detained. U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly and others rejected government evidence because of interrogation tactics ranging from verbal threats to physical abuse they called torture. More than 50 such lawsuits are still pending, two years after the U.S. Supreme Court gave Guantánamo inmates the green light to challenge their detention in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

    Aug. 16

    August 16, 2010 --

    Atlanta graduation rate doesn’t add up ATL to pay slain woman’s family $4.9M Business groups spend thousands bringing legislators to resorts Secretary of State to probe judge candidate’s qualifications

    Evidence flimsy in probe of ethics attorneys

    Evidence flimsy in probe of ethics attorneys
    August 16, 2010 --

    Headlines trumpeted state Inspector General Elizabeth Archer‘s latest findings a few weeks back: “State’s ethics lawyers blasted for outside work.” “State attorneys ran private firm on public time.” “Moonlighting Ethics Commission lawyers violated state policies.” But look closer at Archer’s investigative files, as I did, and you’ll find fairly flimsy evidence behind some of her conclusions. Some “findings” are artfully worded to suggest impropriety without explicitly saying so. Not only that, there’s no sign that her office informed one of the attorneys of a key issue or asked for an explanation.